Illustrator & designer, and author of 2 children’s books:
Book 2, unpublished / The Dome of Tubes
Book 1 / The Biggest Adventure in the Littlest World

Thanks to all of the nice people who retweeted this, and left comments on my post on The Dodo (if I were on Facebook I would have replied to those comments).

It took a good long while before I could bring myself to write about Pie. And I’m glad I did.

Going through my archives and found this piece I did in 2011 as a paper crane template, my contribution to a disaster relief effort after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan (this fundraiser is no longer online).

Going through my archives and found this piece I did in 2011 as a paper crane template, my contribution to a disaster relief effort after the earthquake and tsunami in Japan (this fundraiser is no longer online).

A tribute to Howard Pierce, published in San Louie magazine.
The text reads: “Howard Pierce was a southern California  modernist, born in Chicago in 1912. He worked mostly in clay. A wide range of animals took shape in his hands, their witty, streamlined forms demonstrating the sculptor’s keen understanding of the exchange between design and form. As an artist weaned on vector graphics software I was quick to recognize the rhythm of bézier curves in his pieces, and subsequently rendered them as vector line and shape in an homage to Pierce. Contemporary tools for a master whose work was timeless. Pierce died in 1994, leaving behind a ceramics studio in Joshua Tree.”
We did another spread on collections during the magazine’s short life, which broke the ho-hum of piles of stuff nicely laid out. That idea came from photographer Jen Manuele, who orchestrated a shoot of people with the things from childhood that they treasured the most. There was a blankie with a hole in it. And a beloved stuffed animal that was torn apart by the family pet shortly after its owner retrieved the toy from storage for the shoot. Heartbreaking good times!

A tribute to Howard Pierce, published in San Louie magazine.

The text reads: “Howard Pierce was a southern California  modernist, born in Chicago in 1912. He worked mostly in clay. A wide range of animals took shape in his hands, their witty, streamlined forms demonstrating the sculptor’s keen understanding of the exchange between design and form. As an artist weaned on vector graphics software I was quick to recognize the rhythm of bézier curves in his pieces, and subsequently rendered them as vector line and shape in an homage to Pierce. Contemporary tools for a master whose work was timeless. Pierce died in 1994, leaving behind a ceramics studio in Joshua Tree.”

We did another spread on collections during the magazine’s short life, which broke the ho-hum of piles of stuff nicely laid out. That idea came from photographer Jen Manuele, who orchestrated a shoot of people with the things from childhood that they treasured the most. There was a blankie with a hole in it. And a beloved stuffed animal that was torn apart by the family pet shortly after its owner retrieved the toy from storage for the shoot. Heartbreaking good times!

One of series of vinegar labels done for a Danish company.

One of series of vinegar labels done for a Danish company.

One of three dozen drawings done for the Girl Scouts. Each drawing had to be no bigger than 2 inches by 2 inches, and I was given a color palette.

One of three dozen drawings done for the Girl Scouts. Each drawing had to be no bigger than 2 inches by 2 inches, and I was given a color palette.